7 Kitchen Trends expected to be Big in 2017
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7 Kitchen Trends expected to be Big in 2017


Being at the heart of modern home design, the kitchen has become a place of gathering, of comfort and of spending time with family. It is a space that is now used for casual social visits as well as being a showpiece in any modern home and of course, a zone dedicated to creativity in cooking.

This year we are seeing a shift towards a less formal and more comfortable home in terms of style, usability and functionality with trends reflecting our ever-changing lifestyles and our need for a comforting, stress-free environment to welcome us home at the end of a long day. 

Glen Iris Kitchen Renovation. Click HERE for more information.


Some of the hottest trends to look out for this year in the world of kitchen design are:

1. Scandinavian/Japanese Styling

This year we will experience a shift towards a bold, warm, contemporary interior style exemplified by a fusion of Scandinavian and Japanese styling. This trend is driven by the recent Scandinavian design movement that presented us with smooth elegant lines, crisp whites paired with rustic timbers and an overall sense of tranquil simplicity. Japanese styling and architecture includes similar features, as well as introducing more unique and definitive elements such as bold black lines, natural elements and materials and deep earthy tones such as terracotta. 

The above kitchen and dining area are a perfect representation of how both Scandinavian and Japanese elements can be implemented in a modern kitchen design: bold charcoal lines define elements of the space while rustic exposed brickwork create a stunning backdrop. Dark, mahogany timbers perfectly compliment the terracotta tones of the brick while also allowing for natural texture and colour in the design. Image source Archdaily

This trend also sees a shift away from the glossier surface finishes we’ve seen in the past, to a semi gloss or even a matt finish being used in both cabinetry and benchtops alike. We are also embracing the imperfectly textured surfaces of modern-rustic materials such as terracotta, porcelain and concrete for use on benchtops and as splashbacks. The inclusion of nature in the kitchen will continue to feature prominently, again inspired by the fusion of Scandinavian and Japanese inspired design, with herb planters and other indoor plants being included in kitchen decorating  schemes.

Mellila Collection in terracotta. Click here for more information.


2. Black Tapware

Although chrome fittings in the kitchen (such as tapware and sinks) will always be a safe classic option, a black alternative will continue to feature prominently in kitchen designs of 2017. In keeping with bold Japanese styling, black fittings act as a means of providing a bold element and definition to your new kitchen, making a statement against contrasting colours and textures in your benchtop and cabinetry. 

A black sink and tap makes a bold statement in this clean and crisp kitchen. Pair with black accessories and decor for a coordinated look in your kitchen. Image source

3. Metallic Features

Metallic elements in a kitchen act as means of bouncing and reflecting light around the space while also introducing a luxurious element that works well with many textures such as timber or semi gloss/matt cabinetry. Brass and bronze finishes are set to take the place of the rose gold and copper tones we’ve loved over 2016 as an alternative to the traditional chrome or stainless steel fittings we’ve seen in the past. 

Kethy timber with brushed brass metal ring knobs. Image source 


Including metallic elements in your kitchen design in the form of handles and decor will add a glamorous vibe to the space while also acting as a way of breaking up any rough textures or bold darker colours. Should you tire of the finish, you can easily swap over cabinet handles and decorative accessories once trends change.

4. Tribal Patterns and Colours

Influenced by changes in the world’s social and political beliefs, freedom of expression is represented with astounding vibrant colour and tribal patterns featured in the world of home decor and interior design. Tiled splashbacks are an effective way of introducing bursts of colour and pattern in your kitchen. Tiles will continue to be a go-to option for splashbacks thanks to their durability and ease of maintenance. Aztec and of course, Moroccan inspired pieces will continue to feature prominently in Australian kitchen designs with the inclusion of vibrant colours or patterns. Of course, it can be sometimes difficult to introduce colours in your kitchen; for a simpler look opt for achromatic patterned tiles (as pictured below) that will provide your kitchen design with an element of movement and pattern while complimenting just about any colour palette. 

Kitchen by Austin Design. 


5. Dark timbers

Lighter timber has dominated decorating schemes over the last few years in interiors the world over. Although all hues of timber will forever be considered a classic or timeless feature, 2017 sees the resurface of medium to dark timbers into our homes. Timber feature cupboards are a great way to introduce both colour and texture in your new kitchen and pair well with many different types of finishes and materials for an elegant, timeless and sophisticated natural look. 

Polytec’s ‘Cafe Oak - Ravine’ melamine features in this simple and modern kitchen design. The dark timber-look finish provides a sophisticated contrast with the pure white cabinetry and the thick concrete-look island bench. Image source

6. Shades of Green

With Pantone having named ‘Greenery’ their colour of the year, shades of green will feature prominently in the world of kitchen and interior design, especially fresh grassy greens as well as darker emerald greens. 
Pantone’s Colour of the 2017: Greenery. Image source 


Use these colours to add a sophisticated finishing touch to your kitchen and dining space; a green tiled splashback for example, will add a burst of fresh colour to your design and can be paired with coordinating soft furnishings and kitchen accessories while also creating an effective contrast with deep charcoals, as well as complimenting industrial materials such as concrete and timber.

Perini’s ‘Vattacan’ subway tiles are available in a great range of colours and finishes that will create a timeless style in your new kitchen. Click here to view the complete collection. 

7. Porcelain benchtops

Engineered and natural stones have dominated the kitchen benchtop market for a long time and although they will continue to be a popular choice, porcelain tops are becoming a preferred option thanks to their extreme heat and scratch resistance and general durability. Available in various finishes from textured to woodgrain, matt to gloss, porcelain tops continue to be a high end option due to material and labour costs. It is important to note that due to the hard nature of porcelain products, any exposed edges can be quite brittle and likely to chip with impact. We recommend a minimum of 12mm thickness on a porcelain benchtop to minimise the occurrence of chips.

Dekton is a unique combination of glass, porcelain and quartz which can be used just about anywhere around the home. Image Source


2017 promises to be a year filled with new and exciting design possibilities with so many incredible advances being made every day in kitchen design technology, manufacturing and research. 

Author Bio- Dimitra Dimitriou (Interior designer for Perini Kitchens & Bathrooms)

If you're thinking of renovating your kitchen or bathroom, contact us  HERE.      Benefit from the years and depth of experience of our team, who ensure your kitchen or bathroom is the exact right fit for you and your family’s lifestyle.

All of our work is guaranteed and once our consultation process is completed we can provide a fixed price contract so there are no unexpected costs.

Perini Renovations – Members of HIA (Housing Industry Association) for 25 years.

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